November 13, 2012
queerinnature:

ritchandfamous:

indiegogo.com/queerzombies
facebook.com/zezombie
twitter.com/zezombie
See the teaser trailer here!

perfection. want.

Well. Okay.

queerinnature:

ritchandfamous:

indiegogo.com/queerzombies

facebook.com/zezombie

twitter.com/zezombie

See the teaser trailer here!

perfection. want.

Well. Okay.

(Source: , via momdiggity)

9:02pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyXEnCS9
  
Filed under: queer horror 
August 15, 2012
Oh hey.

Oh hey.

9:48pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyRVtx1n
  
Filed under: gpoy queer femme 
June 27, 2012
"

When I look back at the first night of the Stonewall Inn riots, I could have never imagined its future importance. The first night played out no differently from previous riots involving black Americans and white policemen. And so, too, did its being underreported. But I was there.

On the first night of the Stonewall riots, African Americans and Latinos likely were the largest percentage of the protestors, because we heavily frequented the bar. For homeless black and Latino LGBTQ youth and young adults who slept in nearby Christopher Park, the Stonewall Inn was their stable domicile. The Stonewall Inn being raided was nothing new. In the 1960s gay bars in the Village were routinely raided, but in this case, race may have been an additional factor, given the fact that so many of the patrons were black and Latino, and this was the ’60s.

However, today, African-American and Latino trans communities are relegated to the margins of Greenwich Village, if not expelled from it. These communities nonetheless force their way into being a visible and powerful presence in our lives, leaving indelible imprints while confronted with not only transphobia but also “trans-amnesia.” The inspiration and source of an LGBTQ movement post-Stonewall is an appropriation of a black, brown, trans, and queer liberation narrative and struggle. The Stonewall Riot of June 27 to 29, 1969 in Greenwich Village started on the backs of working-class African-American and Latino queers who patronized that bar. Those brown and black LGBTQ people are not only absent from the photos of that night but have been bleached from its written history. Many LGBTQ blacks and Latinos argue that one of the reasons for the gulf between whites and themselves is the fact that the dominant queer community rewrote and continues to control the narrative of Stonewall.

"

Irene Monroe: Dis-membering Stonewall (via biyuti)

Dear Irene Monroe, Thank you for the phrase “bleached from history”.  sincerely ~#allcity. #want

(via newmodelminority)

(via crashntumble)

3:58pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyOF4Pok
  
Filed under: Stonewall queer 
May 22, 2012
republicoflabia:

This is on my wall. It is rather perfect.

Omg the self-healing garlic patch, YES.

republicoflabia:

This is on my wall. It is rather perfect.

Omg the self-healing garlic patch, YES.

(via brujitaxicanita)

4:35pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyLyapwL
  
Filed under: queer 
April 18, 2012

(Source: i---ickk, via buttlengthangst)

April 15, 2012

(Source: mrgolightly)

1:18am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyJhgvcj
  
Filed under: Cabaret queer 
April 14, 2012
afrodiaspores:

Marsha P. Johnson (1944-1992) at a Gay Liberation Front meeting, ca. 1970. Johnson was “a revolutionary trans activist, Stonewall instigator, Andy Warhol model, drag queen, prostitute, and Saint, as well as a downtown NYC fixture from the 1960’s through her too-soon demise in 1992. Johnson persevered through a life embodied by her middle initial P, which stood for ‘Pay It No Mind.’” She is now the subject of a documentary that takes this phrase as its title.

Marsha P. Johnson, who was a transgender[ ] activist present at the Stonewall riots, was also a founding member of an organization that could only have been started in the 1970s - S.T.A.R. - Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries…Marsha was about as sweet as they come, a fixture on the mean streets who was always ready with a smile…I wanted to share this forgotten gem of a poem [composed by Jimmy Centola, formerly of the Hot Peaches theater troupe] that tells the history of Stonewall and of what happened to the gay movement by the late 70s in Marsha’s voice.


Can you spare any change for a dying queen dar-ling?I mean I am dying.I know you don’t believe me.But I know what I’m talking about.Yes I do.Us queens know what we’re talking about because we’re for liberation, yes we are.Look at the Stonewall.When I first came to New Yorkall pressed and cleanin a white shirt and tiewhat my mother bought meI heard about the Stonewallso I thought I’d go over andcheck it outand LORD!Men are dancing with menand one more gorgeous than anotherand way in the back were my sisters, honeyturning it out in gold lame and wigs for days…

afrodiaspores:

Marsha P. Johnson (1944-1992) at a Gay Liberation Front meeting, ca. 1970. Johnson was “a revolutionary trans activist, Stonewall instigator, Andy Warhol model, drag queen, prostitute, and Saint, as well as a downtown NYC fixture from the 1960’s through her too-soon demise in 1992. Johnson persevered through a life embodied by her middle initial P, which stood for ‘Pay It No Mind.’” She is now the subject of a documentary that takes this phrase as its title.

Marsha P. Johnson, who was a transgender[ ] activist present at the Stonewall riots, was also a founding member of an organization that could only have been started in the 1970s - S.T.A.R. - Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries…Marsha was about as sweet as they come, a fixture on the mean streets who was always ready with a smile…I wanted to share this forgotten gem of a poem [composed by Jimmy Centola, formerly of the Hot Peaches theater troupe] that tells the history of Stonewall and of what happened to the gay movement by the late 70s in Marsha’s voice.

(via plan-swell)

April 11, 2012

(via princeofsparkles)

2:39pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyJUjR8U
  
Filed under: queer 
April 11, 2012

(Source: jobefish)

12:37am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyJTFQpF
  
Filed under: queer glam performance 
April 9, 2012

(via momdiggity)

10:47pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8QfQyJPGtFt
  
Filed under: radical queer 
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